colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
colored boston terriers, boston terriers for sale, blue boston terrier, red boston terrier, cream boston terrier, fawn boston terrier, rare boston terriers, boston puppies for sale, boston terrier standard
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Misconception & Misrepresentation #1:

"Show Breeders are stuck up snobs!"

Show breeders are no different from any other group of people. Yes, there are some snobs. But there are even
more extremely kind show breeders who are in this for the love of the breed (see above photo... they appear to
love what they're doing, do they not?). There are some who talk too little, some who talk too much. There are
show breeders who are bold, and those who let others walk all over them.  There are show breeders who are
helpful, some who are not. Show breeders are just PEOPLE with goals and pride in what they do.

There are also show breeders who are more trusting, and then there are some who have been "burned" in the
past through misplaced trust.  These people may be a bit less lenient in their restrictions and contract.  Each
person's stance on where they allow their dogs and bloodlines to go is their own choice based upon what they
feel is right for their goals. That right is earned, especially by those who have been breeding for many years.

Why are show breeders so protective of their bloodlines? Imagine an artist who has spent years and years
perfecting age old techniques and producing paintings that represent the hours of blood, sweat and tears that
went into their masterpieces.  They are careful where these paintings are displayed because they represent years
of dedication. They would not want to send a painting to someone who felt they needed to make alterations to it to
suit their own preference. They would not want their paintings sold to someone who would make dozens of copies
of it and sell them in quantity based upon demand or for the purpose of profit.
Misconception & Misrepresentation #2:

"Show Breeders just ignorant about colored Bostons"

Actually many are very well versed in the history of the Boston Terrier.
They are aware that these colors once existed. They are aware that they
can naturally appear in a properly bred litter just like any other recessive
trait.

They are also realistic and they are aware of the negative affects of the
profit driven DQ Colored Boston market.  They have seen Bostons of these
colors that have obviously been the result of pairings with another breed.
They have seen the large increase of colored pet quality Bostons sold as
breeding stock in order to supply the fad. They have seen many buyers
who look at a DQ Colored Boston Terrier and jump to purchase it
for
breeding
based upon its coat color alone, and who do not ask about health
testing or evaluate the dog's conformation, movement, and soundness.

Refusal to buy into the breeding practices of these disqualified
color breeders does not mean a reputable breeder is
"uneducated" about them.  It can simply mean that they have
absorbed the information and based upon their experience and
knowledge in producing quality Bostons, have chosen to
dismiss it due to invalid reasoning in breeding against the
acceptable standards of the Boston Terrier.
Misconception & Misrepresentation #3:

"Colored Bostons are exactly the same as standard
Bostons, and they do not have more health issues than a
standard Boston."

While it's true that the only health issue specifically related to their
color is alopecia (in the dilutes) a colored Boston Terrier is not
"exactly the same" in terms of health risks.  If you trace the
pedigree back several generations on a standard show Boston, in
most cases a high percentage of those dogs were bred for
conformation, structure, type and were health tested for hereditary
conditions prior to breeding.  Most DQ Colored Bostons will trace
back to unknown and often backyard bred lines fairly quickly.  
Determining whether or not "Little Peaches" or "Chocolate Charlie"
and the many generations of other unknowns were ever health
tested is next to impossible. Your resulting puppies are not just the
sum of sire and dam, they are the sum of multiple generations and
the traits and genetics that accompanied those dogs.

While it's positive to see breeders of DQ Colored Bostons health
testing their current stock, there are dozens of dogs in any given
pedigree who can make breeding like playing Russian Roulette with
future generations.  While a show breeder can often reference
photos of relatives from decades ago when planning a breeding, a
breeder of DQ Colors can often only guess at what "Billy Brown"
looked like and what his health testing may have yielded.

And again, when a gene pool is shallow, more often choices are
made to keep carriers of genetic issues for breeding in order to
keep their color in a program.   While a color does not affect health,
the breeding practices behind the past generations can have a
devastating impact.
Misconception & Misrepresentation #4:

"Show breeders are racists. It's just like when people had to
sit in the back of the bus."

Wait... what???  REALLY? At the time of the creation of this website,
there are no "breed standards" for humans. Humans are not paired
based upon conformation, and the last person who felt we should
standardize specific characteristics in the human race, didn't fare so
well in the end and he's never been overly popular with the sane
population.

Dog breeds have specific descriptions called their "Standard" which
serves as a guideline for the quality and characteristics inherent in
that specific breed.  Otherwise there wouldn't be different breeds...

Comparing supporting responsible breeding of animals to racism
and segregation of humans is an insult to anyone who actually had
to sit in the back of the bus.  
"You're kidding... Right?"